Energy Management Tag

It's that time of year again - the perfect moment to take a step back, take stock and review our energy management projects to understand what went well and what might be improved next year. What better way to start than with a quick refresher on which topics and energy management articles have been the most popular this year on the Energy Analytics blog?Read on to find out if your favourite post made the Top 10 list...

Thinking of jumping on the solar bandwagon now that prices have bottomed out and it's cheaper than ever to generate your own energy? Bear with me for a moment and consider the following: are you putting the cart before the horse? As cliché as it may sound, any approach to energy management should be looked at holistically and not from an individual solution perspective, argues energy manager Damon Lapping of Green Logik.

Here at DEXMA we’re obsessed with Stranger Things Season 2, so we thought: what better moment than All Hallow's Eve to share the weirdest, scariest energy management horror stories we've ever heard… and how to avoid them, obviously!With that, get ready for the most frightening 13 Energy Manager Nightmares!Keep reading if you dare…👻🎃

It’s one of the first things you reach for when your clients ask for energy savings advice: your trusty submetering, datalogger and energy monitoring hardware catalogue. But when those same customers see the final installation price tag, especially for large building portfolios, their eyes start to water and they begin to have second thoughts… Sounds familiar? Sick of risking so many energy efficiency projects on astronomical hardware costs? Good news, energy managers: now you can skip the risk and the guesswork entirely. In our next free online training on November 9th, we’ll show you how to generate zero-touch energy savings in the cloud.

Green building certifications are essential in meeting global climate targets, but here's the issue: certifications like BREEAM and LEED refer to the intended energy performance of a building, in the context of its design and construction stages.But happens once that building is occupied? The building’s energy performance on paper starts to look very different from the daily reality of its actual use. In fact, according to a RIBA CIBSE database, buildings tend to consume between 1.5 and 2.5 times the amount of energy originally predicted by their designers. That means even smart or green buildings on paper could be running inefficiently in practice - and costing you money. This discrepancy is called the energy performance gap, and our latest free guide is all about closing it using the combined powers of building automation technology and real-time energy analytics.

The transition to low-cost, highly efficient clean energy technology is being accelerated by an accompanying revolution in innovative business models to deploy that technology. As with other similar industry shifts, the fundamental drivers are sound economics combined with the right business model.You've no doubt heard of Software as a Service (SaaS) and its advantages over on-premise software when it comes to investing in energy management. In this guest post by Angela Ferrante of SparkFund, we'll learn about a lucrative new business model called Lumens as a Service.

These days, facility operators and energy managers have a lot on their plates. Keeping up with rapidly evolving building automation technology, constantly changing occupant expectations and best industry practices and standards is getting increasingly difficult. On top of that, there is the ubiquity and security risk of data coming from the ever-expanding Internet of Things, requiring a new set of skills, not to mention the tools to manage building data properly.So how can energy teams keep up with the chaos?Read on to discover some tried and tested strategies to bake building performance into your day-to-day tasks as a facility or energy manager.

There are 6 variables that drive an occupant’s thermal comfort:
  • air temperature
  • surface temperature
  • humidity
  • clothing insulation
  • activity level (metabolic heat)
  • air velocity
The problem? These factors simply don’t tell the full story behind the maintenance involved in optimising temperature in office buildings, commercial buildings, primary schools or university campuses.Thermal comfort depends on other factors as well, like climate and occupant preferences – for example, occupants in Denmark may be more susceptible to humidity and heat levels than occupants in Portugal.The biggest challenges for Commissioning Agents and Facility Managers lie in finding a temperature which is satisfactory for the majority of their occupants, all who may have slightly different preferences, and doing so without sending the energy bill through the roof.Here to tell us the full story behind getting thermal comfort right in buildings is Brenna Buckwalter from BuildPulse.