energy analytics Tag

As the digital transformation of energy gains momentum, energy managers are being bombarded with a growing data deluge. In fact, some of the most common questions we get from new DEXMA partners include "What report should I be viewing?" and "What energy data matters most?"Even though you might be working with a wide range of clients from different industrial sectors, there are certain energy consumption metrics that every energy manager should be looking at. After all, badly configured or ignored metrics will negatively impact your client's cost estimates or retrofit project plans, so it’s important to nip any potential discrepancies the bud. If one of the following analytics doesn’t look quite right, it’s a clear signal that something needs to be tweaked or changed altogether:

Green building certifications are essential in meeting global climate targets, but here's the issue: certifications like BREEAM and LEED refer to the intended energy performance of a building, in the context of its design and construction stages.But happens once that building is occupied? The building’s energy performance on paper starts to look very different from the daily reality of its actual use. In fact, according to a RIBA CIBSE database, buildings tend to consume between 1.5 and 2.5 times the amount of energy originally predicted by their designers. That means even smart or green buildings on paper could be running inefficiently in practice - and costing you money. This discrepancy is called the energy performance gap, and our latest free guide is all about closing it using the combined powers of building automation technology and real-time energy analytics.

These days, facility operators and energy managers have a lot on their plates. Keeping up with rapidly evolving building automation technology, constantly changing occupant expectations and best industry practices and standards is getting increasingly difficult. On top of that, there is the ubiquity and security risk of data coming from the ever-expanding Internet of Things, requiring a new set of skills, not to mention the tools to manage building data properly.So how can energy teams keep up with the chaos?Read on to discover some tried and tested strategies to bake building performance into your day-to-day tasks as a facility or energy manager.

There are 6 variables that drive an occupant’s thermal comfort:
  • air temperature
  • surface temperature
  • humidity
  • clothing insulation
  • activity level (metabolic heat)
  • air velocity
The problem? These factors simply don’t tell the full story behind the maintenance involved in optimising temperature in office buildings, commercial buildings, primary schools or university campuses.Thermal comfort depends on other factors as well, like climate and occupant preferences – for example, occupants in Denmark may be more susceptible to humidity and heat levels than occupants in Portugal.The biggest challenges for Commissioning Agents and Facility Managers lie in finding a temperature which is satisfactory for the majority of their occupants, all who may have slightly different preferences, and doing so without sending the energy bill through the roof.Here to tell us the full story behind getting thermal comfort right in buildings is Brenna Buckwalter from BuildPulse.